Investigations

Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations
Investigations

Investigating crime represents the most obvious responsibility of the Criminal Investigations Division (CID). In order to become a member of the Investigations Division an individual must first become a police officer and serve a minimum of 18 months in the Patrol Division. Once assigned to the Investigations Division, the officer will receive a variety of specialized training and will likely be responsible for investigation of a specific type of criminal activity. Some of these specialty areas include crimes against persons, property crimes, juvenile crimes, white collar crimes and computer crimes. Though responsible for a specific area, officers assigned to the Investigations Division come together to investigate major crimes which diversifies the responsibilities of the position. Members of the Investigations Division are recognized by titles of Detective, Investigator, and Inspector, based on years of service in the Division.

Investigators carry a continuous "case load" of about thirty cases. As cases are solved, additional cases are assigned. The CID supervisor will assign cases depending on their significance and solvability factors. For example a suspicious person case would normally not be assigned to an investigator. If, however, the suspicious person incident occurred in a high burglary area, the case is given to a property crimes investigator. If the suspicious person incident occurred near a recent rape, the sex crimes investigator would receive the case.

Solvability factors include those leads which help investigators solve the case. Examples include names or descriptions of suspects, serial numbers or identifying marks on stolen property, or witnesses to the crime. Therefore, a minor theft is more likely to be assigned for follow-up investigation if it has a number of leads than the theft of a more expensive item with no leads to follow-up.

We offer anyone the opportunity to stop by and visit. Or, call our anonymous tip number 742-8327 with information concerning criminal activity.

(Some images provided by Stillwater NewsPress)